The Vermont Legislature has given final approval to a charter change in Brattleboro that would allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in municipal elections.

The Vermont Legislature has given final approval to a charter change in Brattleboro that would allow 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in municipal elections. Voters in Brattleboro approved the charter change back in 2019. Now, with full legislative approval, the bill heads to the governor. The charter change bill, which has now passed both the House and Senate, would allow 16-and 17-year-olds in Brattleboro voting power and the ability to run for local office, like the town Select Board. The charter change, however, would not apply to statewide elections. But it appears to be heading toward a veto from the governor. “I just think it should be consistent throughout Vermont. So, if we are going to allow 16- and 17-years-olds to vote, we should take that up on a statewide basis,” said Gov. Phil Scott. Scott also notes that lawmakers are currently considering raising the age of responsibility for youth criminal behavior because of research that points to cognitive decision-making that is not fully developed. Other critics say students aren’t educated enough on issues like property taxes and school budgets. Legislators could still override a potential veto if they are able to muster the same amount of votes that passed the bill.

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https://www.reformer.com/local-news/brattleboro-youth-vote-gets-senate-approval/article_28203284-8cfe-11ec-b907-3f14ed38ddf5.html