Vermont lawmakers are working on a compromise bill to make it harder for people who are prohibited from buying guns to do so

Vermont lawmakers are working on a compromise bill to make it harder for people who are prohibited from buying guns to do so. Last month, Gov. Scott vetoed a bill passed by the Legislature that would have extended to 30 days the maximum background-check waiting period to purchase firearms. Currently, if a background check isn’t completed within three days, the purchase is allowed to go forward, creating what is known as the Charleston Loophole. On Tuesday a Vermont Senate committee approved a compromise bill that would have reduced the maximum waiting period to seven days, which Scott has indicated he could accept. “It wasn’t a position I was initially in line with but after thinking about it and talking it over with the chair, it seemed like it was best to accept the hand that had been offered,” said state Sen. Phil Baruth, a Democrat from Chittenden County. The legislation would also help keep firearms out of hospitals and clarified when a judge can order a defendant to relinquish firearms while an emergency relief-from-abuse order is in effect. The full Senate is expected to vote on the compromise later this week.