Wildlife officials in Vermont and New Hampshire are asking the public to leave newborn fawns and other wildlife alone

Wildlife officials in Vermont and New Hampshire are asking the public to leave newborn fawns and other wildlife alone.

They say the majority of does give birth in May and June and just because a fawn appears to be on its own, it does not mean they have been abandoned

If you think a fawn or other young wildlife has been abandoned or orphaned, officials ask you to not move the animal.

In the coming weeks, deer will begin giving birth around the Granite State, with the majority of deer fawns being born in May and June. Each spring, many New Hampshire residents see young deer by themselves and fear the worst. Has the mother died? Has she abandoned her fawn? The answer in most cases is no. The doe is usually not far off, waiting to return to feed her newborn.

Unfortunately, some well-intentioned individuals who see fawns alone assume they are abandoned and sometimes take them in to try to help. Most of the time, however, they are removing the fawn from the care it needs. The best chance a young wild animal has to survive is in its natural environment under the care of its mother. If you suspect a fawn or other young wildlife has been abandoned or orphaned, do not move the animal. Learn more at wildnh.com